Down a drain.

The same as yours.
26/M/Columbus
Fri Jul 25
  • littlefinger: chaos isn't a pit, it's a ladder
  • varys: but do you know what is a pit
  • some bards: *start playing a pop punk version of the rains of castamere*
  • varys: *starts moshing*
  • littlefinger: *starts moshing*
Thu Jul 24
asapscience:

this-one-moment:

He just accepts it right away.

<3 Is this love? 

asapscience:

this-one-moment:

He just accepts it right away.

<3 Is this love? 

(Source: ferfilelek)

  • The US Government: We're not going to make it federally mandatory for people to get paid a wage they can actually live off of
  • The US Government: If people want to make a living, they'll just have to work 16+ hours a day
  • The US Government: And if their kids end up disenfranchised because of a lack of parental involvement, well that's not our problem
  • The US Government: In fact, what is our problem is creating a system that will funnel these disenfranchised youth into our prison system so they can work for corporations (that promise us money) for damn near free
  • The US Government: If they don't want to fall victim to this system, then they can seek higher education
  • The US Government: Except such an education will be inaccessible to most disenfranchised people and skewed in favor of the financially stable and white people
  • The US Government: And we're not going to make intervention programs like sex education and conflict resolution federally mandatory, because that's the parent's job
  • The US Government: The parent who is working 16 hours a day
Wed Jul 23
msniiina:

Soon you can wear my thing …

msniiina:

Soon you can wear my thing …

(via yikesyoustrangers)

Tue Jul 22
ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

No, thers nothing in my eye

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

No, thers nothing in my eye

Mon Jul 21
asapscience:

Can you figure out what’s on this list?
via SciencePorn 

asapscience:

Can you figure out what’s on this list?

via SciencePorn 

putthison:

How Clothes Can Affect the Way People Treat You
NPR has an interesting story about how some African-Americans used turbans to deal with discrimination in the Jim Crow era. An excerpt:

Routté’s experiment began after he traveled to Mobile, Ala., in 1943 for a family engagement. He wasn’t happy with how he was treated.
"I was Jim Crowed here, Jim Crowed there, Jim Crowed all over the place," he later told reporters. "And I didn’t like being Jim Crowed."
So he went back in 1947, with a plan.
Before he boarded the train to Alabama, he put on his spangled turban and velvet robes. When the train reached North Carolina during lunchtime, Routté walked over to the diner car where the only vacant seat was occupied by two white couples.
One of the men said, “Well, what have we got here?” to which Routté replied in his best Swedish accent (he had been the only black student at a Swedish Lutheran college in Illinois), “We have here an apostle of goodwill and love” — leaving them gaping.
And that confusion seemed to work for Routté on the rest of his trip. He dropped in on police officials, the chamber of commerce, merchants — and was treated like royalty.
At a fancy restaurant he asked the staff what would happen if a “Negro gentleman comes in here and sits down to eat.” The reply: “No negro would dare to come in here to eat.”
"I just stroked my chin and ordered my dessert," he said.
[…]
"He didn’t change his color. He just changed his costume, and they treated him like a human," says Luther Routté, who has been a Lutheran pastor for 25 years. It "shows you the kind of myopia that accompanies the whole premise of apartheid or segregation."
Through the “turban trick,” Routté basically transformed himself from a threat to a guest — black to invisible.

You can read the whole story here.

putthison:

How Clothes Can Affect the Way People Treat You

NPR has an interesting story about how some African-Americans used turbans to deal with discrimination in the Jim Crow era. An excerpt:

Routté’s experiment began after he traveled to Mobile, Ala., in 1943 for a family engagement. He wasn’t happy with how he was treated.

"I was Jim Crowed here, Jim Crowed there, Jim Crowed all over the place," he later told reporters. "And I didn’t like being Jim Crowed."

So he went back in 1947, with a plan.

Before he boarded the train to Alabama, he put on his spangled turban and velvet robes. When the train reached North Carolina during lunchtime, Routté walked over to the diner car where the only vacant seat was occupied by two white couples.

One of the men said, “Well, what have we got here?” to which Routté replied in his best Swedish accent (he had been the only black student at a Swedish Lutheran college in Illinois), “We have here an apostle of goodwill and love” — leaving them gaping.

And that confusion seemed to work for Routté on the rest of his trip. He dropped in on police officials, the chamber of commerce, merchants — and was treated like royalty.

At a fancy restaurant he asked the staff what would happen if a “Negro gentleman comes in here and sits down to eat.” The reply: “No negro would dare to come in here to eat.”

"I just stroked my chin and ordered my dessert," he said.

[…]

"He didn’t change his color. He just changed his costume, and they treated him like a human," says Luther Routté, who has been a Lutheran pastor for 25 years. It "shows you the kind of myopia that accompanies the whole premise of apartheid or segregation."

Through the “turban trick,” Routté basically transformed himself from a threat to a guest — black to invisible.

You can read the whole story here.

(via pushinghoopswithsticks)

Sat Jul 19